The Perfect Hard-Boiled Egg

The Perfect Hard-Boiled Egg

Share on FacebookPin on PinterestTweet about this on TwitterShare on RedditShare on StumbleUponShare on Tumblr

Spring is in full swing here at the Small Table.  Little S is on spring break from school, the daffodils are blooming, and birds have started chirping (yell-chirping!) outside my bedroom window around 4:30 every morning.  All of this calls for some perfect hard-boiled eggs.  We like to color them, then devour them with melted cheese on warm buttered toast for dinner.  Why do we not hide them, you ask? It’s because in the first grade I ‘hid’ a beautiful colored egg deep in my sock drawer, to ‘keep it safe,’ of course!  My mom’s nose led her to it about three weeks later; it was rather traumatic.  We had to throw away most of the socks.  So, better to enjoy the beauty for a day, and the taste that very night.

For the last several years, I have used a method I learned from this slightly wacky  YouTube video.

Start your eggs in a pan of cold water.  As Mr. Ferriss instructs, make sure the water covers the eggs by one or two inches.  Add a teaspoon of baking soda.  Bring the water to a boil, then turn down the heat so the water is just boiling. Boil at a slow boil for 12 minutes.  Drain the eggs and place them in cold water to stop the cooking.  Refrigerate until you are ready to color them.  I love this technique because the soda really does make them easier to peel (I don’t blow the egg out like he does, but I guess you could.)  Also, 12 minutes seems to be the ideal time for getting the yolk cooked without overdoing it– and avoiding that slightly disturbing overcooked-greenish cast.

When you’ve got your eggs boiled, it’s time to dye them!  This year, we tried the technique for jeweled eggs from the Barefoot Kitchen Witch.  Please follow the link if you’d like, as I will not fully detail the process here.  I will just say that the egg shells are cracked, but left on.  Then they are dyed for several hours in cold water in the fridge, to keep them safely edible.   When you finally peel them they emerge looking like lovely crackled jewels.  Just what a spring day with no school calls for! Here are our beauties: ready to admire for a few hours, then it’s on to crunchy slices of buttered toast for dinner.  Mmm.  Spring.

Blue Jewel Egg

Pink Jewel Egg

Fine Print @ The Small Table:  Please do not copy images, text, or recipes from The Luxury of a Small Table without linking back to this site.  All content provided on The Luxury of a Small Table is for information/ entertainment purposes only.

 

Share on FacebookPin on PinterestTweet about this on TwitterShare on RedditShare on StumbleUponShare on Tumblr
Comments are closed.
error: Content is protected !!